History’s Palette

Written By Rosemary Carstens      

TELEVISION TODAY BRINGS US ONE SERIES AFTER ANOTHER featuring forensic scientists solving crimes. But forensic science also plays an important role in solving mysteries in the art world. It can expose forgeries and reveal the fascinating methods of ancient masters and the rare and unusual pigments they used. An art materials repository, the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies is…

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Architectural Artistry

Written By David M. Brown      

FOR THE SYMINGTON FAMILY, their home in Paradise Valley, Arizona, is the beginning of each day’s journey and the end. Here, they welcome the opportunities offered by the sunrise and the refuge of sunset.  John Symington is a hiker, and he and his wife, Marcella Billups Symington, envisioned their home as a celebration of their passions: heirloom antiques, artwork and…

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Multicultural Modernism

Written By Carter G. Walker      

KHARLENE BOXENBAUM KNOWS WHAT SHE LIKES and she doesn’t mince words. “Unless horses are going in, I think garages are really terrible,” she says.  Suitably, the garage in her Beverly Hills home is underground, and unseen. A victory for the artist, the sacred over the profane. A contemporary painter and devotee of mid-century design, Boxenbaum was equally precise about what…

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The Prix de West Creating New Traditions

Written By Myrna Zanetell      

IF THERE IS ONE COMMONALITY among Prix de West artists, it is that each of their sculptures and paintings tells a story that deepens and enriches the tradition of Western art. Some of these are historical in nature, others record vignettes of daily life, while many of the most touching are simply told by capturing the beauty of the natural world.…

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Grounded in History

Written By Steve Winston      

TURN-OF-THE-CENTURY TAOS, NEW MEXICO, hardly seemed the type of place to spark an art revolution. It was a dusty, isolated, frontier outpost… in a territory that wasn’t even a state yet. Within just a few years, however, this sleepy old village metamorphosed into one of the greatest art towns in America. And Joseph Henry Sharp [1859–1953] and Eanger Irving Couse…

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Creative Space

Written By Corinne Garcia       Photography By Dror Baldinger      

THEY SAY THE EYES ARE THE WINDOWS TO THE SOUL, but perhaps the home is as well. At the very least, it is a reflection of the spirit and essence of those who reside there, and Jene and Jean Lamans’ San Marcos, Texas, residence is a prime example.  Their home is a reflection of a love of craftsmanship, evident in…

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A Painter of Place

AS WITH MANY ARTISTS FROM THE WEST, Josh Elliott is obsessed with the landscape. It’s difficult not to be when you live in a place such as Montana, a place where you are surrounded by the best nature has to offer.  But also like many artists from the West, Elliott doesn’t consider himself a “Western artist.” “I’m an artist who…

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Welcome Home

Written By Christine Phillips       Photography By Roger Wade      

TUCKED AWAY AT THE END of a pasture on her family’s ranch, Roxie Simpson’s home in Roscoe, Montana, is a welcoming blend of timber, steel, glass and stone. Overlooking the Rosebud River, lined with 100-year-old cottonwood trees, the home was designed with the landscape in mind. “The home sits low on the property where it does not compete with its…

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The Spirit of Old Taos

Written By Gussie Fauntleroy      

IF JERRY JORDAN WAS A BETTING MAN — which he’s not, having grown up in a West Texas Pentecostal churchgoing family — he would never have put down money on the chances of ending up with the life he has. What are the odds of a 16-year-old farm boy wandering through the open door of a painter’s studio — which happened…

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Turning 30 with Andy Warhol

Written By Richard Polsky      

ON MAY 17, 2017, the National Museum of Wildlife Art, located in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, will open an exhibition of Andy Warhol’s Endangered Species prints to kick off its 30th anniversary celebration. Despite boasting a diverse collection of some 5,000 works of wildlife art, there’s nothing like a Warhol show to generate buzz and bring in an audience. Warhol’s group…

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On A Wing

Written By Isabelle Walker      

THEY TUMBLE FROM THE SKY, quotidian or miraculous, depending on how you look at them. When you find one on the ground, if from a North American migratory bird, it will be illegal to pick up and keep, but some say it’s still lucky, like a penny, only better. If all white, an angel may be near.  For artist Chris…

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The Eyes Have It

Written By Robert Kaufman      

TRUTH BE TOLD, Glenna Goodacre broke the mold the moment the tenacious artist bucked the advice of her sculpture professor at Colorado College, who suggested she forgo pursuing a career in sculpting because of her inability to visualize in 3-D. Instead, Goodacre realized her artistic talent and, in 1996, having already secured her legacy as one of the world’s most revered…

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Photographing The West She Knows and Loves

Written By Susan Hallsten McGarry      

IN DOWNTOWN BIG TIMBER, MONTANA, the Grand Hotel is a hub of activities. As you enter the lobby, you “meet” Barbara Van Cleve via one of her large-format photographs displayed prominently behind the vintage registration desk. Wander into the historic saloon and you find an image from her Lady Godiva series behind the bar. Join Van Cleve for a meal…

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This Land is Our Land

Written By Laura Zuckerman      

MORE THAN MANY EXHIBITS, the February opening of Mi Tierra: Contemporary Artists Explore Place, at the Denver Art Museum (DAM), raises questions about the role art plays in social and political dialectics. It also asks if images and multimedia installations chart the course in an eternal quest for American identity. The simple answers are yes and yes. But there is…

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Meeting in the Middle

Written By Eliza Cross       Photography By David Patterson      

IT ALL STARTED WITH A TALL HILL AND A SIX-PACK OF BEER. Corey Larsen, co-owner of Dimension Fine Homes, happened upon a man and a woman stuck on the steep road leading to their Steamboat Springs, Colorado, vacation house. Taking pity on the newlyweds, Larsen loaned them his truck. Later, when the grateful couple dropped by with some beer to…

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The Wild Enigma

Written By Todd Wilkinson      

INCESSANTLY, ARTISTS ARE ASKED by art writers to toss around names. The names of individuals who lit fires in their bellies or catalyzed the direction of their work. It’s exceedingly rare to find an older living animal sculptor in America whose grasp of three-dimensional forms was influenced by Buckminster Fuller, Willem and Elaine deKooning, and David Smith. Les Perhacs did not…

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The Tribute

Written By Nicole Borgenicht       Photography By Christopher Marona      

IT'S A SPECIAL THING when a homeowner’s passion inspires the architectural design of their home. For the Johnson family, Native American history and Pueblo architecture became a primary inspiration for their residence in southwest Colorado.  Designed by architect Jon Pomeroy and built by Aaron Taylor Construction, the home of Tom and Diane Johnson is a contemporary interpretation of the classic, historic…

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Meditations on Winter

Written By Rosemary Carstens      

WINTER. IN THE FROZEN NORTH, a casual glance takes in vast swaths of unrelenting white, yet a closer look reveals prisms of pinks, blues, lavenders and grays scattered across the landscape by refracted light. Moving south, winter brings a spare palette of leafless trees, slate-colored branches piercing the sky, frozen waterways and an unexpected abundance of wildlife. But in these climes…

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Pictographs on the Pecos

Written By Todd Wilkinson      

ON THE NORTHEAST CORNER of Santa Fe’s historic Plaza, at the intersection of Palace Avenue and Washington Street, sits an architecturally interesting yet unassuming adobe gallery. Its contents, in a way, can be traced to some of the oldest artisans in the Americas. While known as a crossroads of contemporary Western art, the Worrell Gallery, foremost, is identified with the…

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The Evolution of Taste

Written By Corinne Garcia       Photography By Matt Winquist      

THERE'S NO DOUBT THAT AS YEARS GO BY, tastes can change. A one-time cherished piece of art or furniture may lose its luster, at least in the owner’s eyes, as trends and lifestyles evolve and shift. This was certainly the case for a Midwestern couple who exchanged their 9,000-square-foot classic Victorian home near Cincinnati, Ohio, for a Bauhaus-inspired modern home…

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Leaving a Legacy

Written By Kathy Chin Leong      

IN 1993, ALLAN AFFELDT READ AN ARTICLE in Preservation magazine that would change his life forever. In this publication was a list of the country’s most important buildings slated for demolition. La Posada Hotel in Winslow, Arizona, was one of them. Abandoned since 1957, the once-elegant La Posada was reduced to a shell, and the owners, the Santa Fe Railroad, were…

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Attending to Nature

Written By Laura Zuckerman      

THERE IS SOMETHING OF THE OLD WORLD about artist Francois Koch. The painter of landscapes found in the Northern Rocky Mountains and the American Southwest is, in one word, courtly. That quality is as appealing now as it was when celebrated in literature of another age. And it’s especially noteworthy at a time when thoughts can be reduced to numbered syllables…

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Meow Wolf’s The House of Eternal Return

Written By Corinne Garcia       Photography By Dana Aaberg      

IT'S NO SECRET that Santa Fe, New Mexico,  embraces art. The Plaza is a regular venue for art markets; museums filled with Native American and Hispanic fine art abound; Site Santa Fe, an 18,000-square-foot contemporary art space, buzzes; and, of course, there’s Canyon Road, with more than 80 galleries, along with the Railyard and Downtown arts districts. Artists of all…

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Crossing Over

Written By Todd Wilkinson      

ALMOST A QUARTER CENTURY AGO, well into middle age and just shy of his 44th year, John Coleman shucked aside real estate development and, as a veritable unknown, ventured into the world of Western art. Not long afterward, something extraordinary happened: Coleman became a phenomenon. Like a comet suddenly streaking across the horizon, his emergence — most notably, his sophisticated sculptures…

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At Home on the Range

Written By Gussie Fauntleroy      

IT'S BEEN SAID THAT WESTERN PAINTER Frederic Remington wanted these words carved on his tombstone: “He Knew the Horse.” Remington’s wife, aware that she would eventually be lying beside him, apparently vetoed the idea. But the renowned artist’s claim to a thorough understanding of the equine form cannot be denied. Tom Livesay, executive director of the Briscoe Western Art Museum in…

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Organic by Nature

Written By Kathy Chin Leong       Photography By Jeremy Bitterman      

IF FRENCH IMPRESSIONIST CLAUDE MONET WERE ALIVE, he would have painted this scene: A rectangular house with a glass façade, appearing in a lush forest. The structure is suspended over a reflection pond, its mirrored image interrupted only by a scarlet rowboat.  Welcome to the home of Michael Etzel and Carey Critchlow, whose passionate connection to nature evolved into a modern…

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Beyond Skin Deep

Written By Rosemary Carstens      

THIS SPRING, A CROWD GATHERED at Sotheby’s New York City auction house for its Contemporary sale. Two Studies for a Self-Portrait, by figurative painter Francis Bacon [1909–1992], drew special attention. After rapid-fire bidding, the 1970 painting (with an estimated value of $20 to $30 million) hammered at a final price of $34.9 million. The intense interest in this work stems partially…

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Grounded in Nature

Written By Todd Wilkinson      

IN SIMON GUDGEON'S WILDLY STIMULATING SCULPTURES, there are often literal openings of space awaiting the viewer; keyholes that plunge through mass, inviting us to be transported from where we are to a deeper place of contemplation. In Search for Enlightenment — Gudgeon’s acclaimed monumental work that was publicly exhibited in London, not far from Tate Britain — the surrealist outlines…

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Curated, Santa Fe Style

Written By Shari Morrison       Photography By Daniel Nadelbach      

FOR 10 YEARS, JEFFREY GRACIANO AND TERRENCE MCELLIGOTT frequently traveled from their home in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, to the great Southwest. Along the way, they fell in love with “a wonderful little town” that felt “like a little European village.” It had so many things to love — from fine art and great restaurants, to delightful little shops and friendly people. And,…

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Inspired by the Great Masters

Written By Laura Zuckerman      

“By depicting artworks in her compositions, Cortez underscores a classic paradox of painting: the painting as a ‘window’ into an imagined space and as a physical object — both a metaphysical presence and a material entity. Cortez chooses to utilize her talent for realism to illuminate the ordinary.” — Trailside Galleries IN A QUIET CORNER OF UPSTATE NEW YORK, Jenness…

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The Horse in Art

Written By Corinne Garcia      

When painter Carol Spielman grew up in Washington’s San Juan Islands in the 1970s, horses were her main source of transportation. One afternoon, she and her friends rode bareback to the beach and right into the water. “We walked out about a half mile to where they couldn’t touch. The second they can’t touch they start to swim, and you…

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Think Big: Live Small

Written By Sarah Chase Shaw       Photography By David Lauer      

RKD PRINCIPAL JACK SNOW WAS COMPLETING THE PLANS for a 6,000-square-foot home on a ranch in western Colorado when his clients put the brakes on the project. Despite Snow’s positive temperament, his disappointment was palpable.  “This was by far the most intriguing sculpture I’ve ever designed,” he says, describing a series of overlapping and irregular planes that formed the proposed roofline.…

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